Installing and Repairing Telephone Systems: How to Splice Telephone wire

Jerry WalchStarred Page By Jerry Walch, 7th Feb 2012 | Follow this author | RSS Feed | Short URL http://nut.bz/384t6li6/
Posted in Wikinut>Guides>DIY>Electrical

There are several methods that can be employed when splicing AWG 22 or 24 solid-copper telephone wire but the button splice device is the quickest and easiest for the inexperienced installer/repairman to use. Whenever possible you should replace the full section of wiring instead of splicing it but there will be times when splicing is the only alternative and this is the best way to do it.

Introduction

In Installing and Repairing Telephone Systems: Part 2, I explained how to use the Fluke 3000 tone generator and probe set to locate a break or short in telephone system wiring. Once you have located the break or short in the wiring, you will need to repair the problem. The best way to repair such a problem is to remove the old section of wiring and replace it with a new length of wiring between the fixed junction blocks instead of splicing in a short section somewhere along its length. Splices, no matter how expertly performed are always weaker than the original wiring. But there will be times when replacing the full length of the wire will not be possible and you will need to splice in a short length of wire to bridge gap caused by the defective section you cut out.

The tools and supplies that you will need.


  • 3M Scotchlok Type UR Connectors
  • Telephone station wire
  • Klein ScotchLok Connector Crimping pliers
  • Diagonal Pliers/Side Cutter Pliers/Wire Cutters
  • Adjustable Wire Strippers
  • Small flat-Blade screwdriver

Adjust the wire strippers

Using a short piece of the station wire as a test piece, adjust the wire strippers depth of cut so they cut through the cables outer jacket without cutting into the insulation of the individual enclosed conductors. This may take a few tries and several pieces of station cable to get right but it is essential that you get the cutting depth set correctly before using the strippers on the actual station wiring. These adjustable wire strippers are relatively inexpensive so I have different ones for every type of cable that I normally work with, that way I do not have to keep readjusting their cutting depths.

Preparing to make the splice.

First, using the Diagonal Pliers cut out a small section of the station wire where the break or short circuit has occurred.
Second, using the wire strippers, remove two inches of the outer jacket from the end of each section of station wire.
Third, using the crimping tool as pliers, tug on each of the individual exposed conductors to make sure you have removed the section where the break was. If the break still exist, the brokn wire will slip out of the jacket. If that happens you will have to cut the wire back further until you reach the intact section.
Fourth, cut a new piece of station wire four inches longer than the gap left by the piece you removed from the original wire. The reason for this is that you want the splice to be tension free once you make it.
Fifth, remove two inches of the outer jacket from each end of the station wire that you will be slicing in.

Making the splice.

When splicing 4-conductor station wire, you will be splicing red to red, green to green, black to black, and yellow to yellow. Therefore for each new section of station wiring that you splice in you will need eight Scothlok Type UR connectors.
To make the splices, simply insert the two wires to be spliced together all the way inside the connector, one wire per hole, and squeeze the button all the way down with the crimping tool. Do not strip the insulation off the wire first. The insulation will be pierced by the crimping action and the electrical connection made.
Once you have crimped the connector closed, gently tug on the wires to make sure they are being held firmly by the button connector.

Recheck the line for continuity.

Once you have replaced the bad section of station wiring, use the tone generator and receiver probe to recheck the line to be sure no other problem areas still exists in the wiring. If everything checks good, reconnect the house wiring at the NID.

Related articles and video

Installing and Repairing Telephone Systems: Part 1
Installing and Repairing Telephone Systems: Part 2

How-to make splice video

Tags

Installing, Networkinterface Device, Nid, Receiver Probe, Repairing, Splice, Splicing, Telephone System Wiring, Telephone Systems, Tone Generator

Meet the author

author avatar Jerry Walch
Jerry Walch is a 70 year old freelance writer for hire living in Colorado Springs, Colorado. He has been writing since the late 1970s, and writes for both the print and online media. He specializes in

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Comments

author avatar stephaniemorris26
8th Feb 2012 (#)

I am absolutely loving all of these articles. Very informative and easy to follow instructions!

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author avatar Jerry Walch
8th Feb 2012 (#)

Well, Stephanie, I try to practice the K.I.S.S. (Keep It Simple Stupid) principle at all times. Now before someone thinks that I'm implying that I think some of my readers are stupid or ignorant, I'm not. The K.I.S.S. principle is more for me than it is for them because it helps me keep the jargon under control. An editor pointed out to me very early on in my writing career that I had a tendency to use words that only another engineer would understand and he turned me on to the K.I.S.S. Principle which keep my vocabulary in check

Thanks for reading and commenting.

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author avatar Denise O
8th Feb 2012 (#)

Now Jerry, I have made this repair. You explain it darn well. As always, just a great page. Thank you for sharing.:)

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author avatar Jerry Walch
8th Feb 2012 (#)

Thank you for dropping in, Denise.

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author avatar Mark Gordon Brown
8th Feb 2012 (#)

I still have the old style phone, great information on repairs.

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author avatar Jerry Walch
8th Feb 2012 (#)

Yes, Mark, there are many areas here in the US where the old pulse dial systems are still in use too--especially in the rural and mountain areas.

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author avatar Lady Aiyanna
8th Feb 2012 (#)

We used to use this back in india to repair our phone lines. It was common during the winter months wherein water lodged within them and spoilt the clarity of sound...

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author avatar Jerry Walch
8th Feb 2012 (#)

Water is a problem here in the US too, especially where residential line are ran from the NID underground in conduit and the conduit isn't properly sealed at the exposed end. I have had to blow the water out of those underground conduit runs, pull in new wire, and properly seal the conduit runs on many occasions. Water filled conduits is a common problem in mobile home parks.

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author avatar Shaunak
8th Feb 2012 (#)

Very informative.

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author avatar Jerry Walch
8th Feb 2012 (#)

Thank you, sir.

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author avatar Buzz
8th Feb 2012 (#)

Great info, Jerry. Thank you.

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author avatar Jerry Walch
8th Feb 2012 (#)

Thank you for reading and commenting, Buzz.

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author avatar David Reinstein,LCSW
8th Feb 2012 (#)

For a klutz like me, wireless phone service is a real blessing! :-}

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author avatar Jerry Walch
8th Feb 2012 (#)

Even wireless services can have its problems, David and troubleshooting those problems can be great deal more difficult. Not to mention the fact that the test equipment needed to troubleshoot wireless phone is a great deal more expensive and harder to master.

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author avatar Jules, The Cowboy
9th Feb 2012 (#)

great tools and tips...

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author avatar Jerry Walch
9th Feb 2012 (#)

Thanks Cowboy. The Klein crimping tools does just as good a job as the one shown in the 3M video and only cost about 1/3 as much.

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author avatar Sheila Newton
9th Feb 2012 (#)

Wow - the stuff I learn from you, Jerry! Great star page.

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author avatar Jerry Walch
9th Feb 2012 (#)

Thanks, Sheila. You always make my day.

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author avatar Delicia Powers
10th Feb 2012 (#)

I know I could do this thanks to your clear instructions, wonderful:0)!

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author avatar Jerry Walch
10th Feb 2012 (#)

Thank you for reading and for commenting, Delicia.

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author avatar Denise O
12th Feb 2012 (#)

Jerry, thank you for the message, it means so much to me. I hope you are having a great day. My Mr. Tristan will be here any moment now. I am cooking his fav. (Same as his daddy's) speg and meat sauce. When the boy is served this, he is stripped down to his diaper. He wears it, from head to toes. So I just wanted to let you know, this Alabama woman knows, you are just as sweet as, homemade pecan pie. Have a blessed day.:)

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author avatar Jerry Walch
12th Feb 2012 (#)

Well, Denise, you are so darn sweet that homemade pecan pie is sour by comparison.

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author avatar NancyG in TN
19th Feb 2012 (#)

Ditto what my friend David Reinstein said!

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author avatar Retired
29th Feb 2012 (#)

very useful and practical information. thanx jerry for sharing.

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author avatar Jerry Walch
29th Feb 2012 (#)

Thank you for reading and for commenting, Waleed.

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